How to Write Killer Copy For Your Direct Mailings

Posted on 2011-02-15 by Jenny

How to Write Killer Copy that Boosts Response Rates and ROI

Alice Brown – Editor

Killer copy (or content/text) helps ‘sell’ your products and services and is crucial to the success of any direct mail campaign; so take a second to digest these quick tips to writing killer copy that boosts response rates and your ROI.

It’s all about the ‘Benefits’

Write about the ‘benefits’ of your product/services and less about your products’ ‘features’. benefits’ focus on your customers.

Benefit oriented statements/phrases focus the attention on your customers ad help your customers understand how your products/services will make their life just that little bit easier.

A gardening service could highlight the ‘benefits’ of their lawn care service by writing:

“Free up your weekend and relax! We’ll take care of your lawn and garden so you don’t have to.”

 

An example of a boring, ‘feature’ oriented piece of copy:

“We use professional lawn care tools and our team is quick and efficient”.

 

Get Emotional!

People respond and react to their emotions, so connect with your customers and use text/copy that sparks ‘emotion’. Understand who they are, and connect with them ‘emotionally’.

Example: “We know times are tough – and we want to help…introducing free coffee Mondays!”

Conversational Style

Don’t use stiff, ‘advertising talk’ or impersonal text – it’s cold and boring and will quickly get your promotional mail piece tossed in the trash.

Get ‘personal’ and write as if you’re having a conversation with your customer. Conversational style (‘you’, ‘we’ etc) breaks down barriers and connects you with your customers.

Less is More

People ‘scan’ text and copy so keep your text short and your offer bold and clear. Tell your story, and then stop.

Active voice

Use the ‘active’ present tense and drop your passive tense phrases. The active/present tense creates a sense of immediacy and urgency while the passive tense feels awkward and detached.

Present tense: “The dog bit the boy.”

Passive tense: “The boy was bitten by the dog.”

 

Offer

Your offer is the most important copy of your direct mail piece, so don’t rush it – take the time to create a powerful, compelling promotion that will grab your readers’ attention and push them to take action.

 

 

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